Remember Mowgli?

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Shashi tell me, “Today we are going to one of the most important landmarks in Central India – Mowgli Land.” The very name Mowgli makes me keenly interested. Most of you would know that Mowgli is world renowned character from The Jungle Book, a fiction written by Joseph Rudyard Kipling in nineteenth century (1894). Mowgli is portrayed as man-cub reared by wolves, living among wild animals almost like a wild animal.

We start from Seoni after breakfast around 9.30. We are driving on a four lane road. As we progress, in one and an half hours, from four lane Seoni-Mandla State Highway, we are on two, and than one, and later no lane road. Finally, it’s dead end! We have arrived.

I notice from a sign board, we are in Kanhiwada Range of the South Seoni Territorial Forest Division. The place is closely surrounded by hills which are densely forested all around. Looking down a narrow gorge, I notice a rivulet flowing. Tej Bhan Pandey, Sub-Division Officer, with us informs, “This is the Hirni River, a jungle stream, originating in Rukhad Forest Range near Seoni.”

Shashi tells me, “This place is also known as Amodagarh.”  Garh is for a fort. I notice it is isolated enough today and wonder what it would have been centuries ago. There is no fort or ruin around, which I can see. I wonder if this is just an imagination. Local forest guard shows me the remains of a wall which is supposed to have surrounded the fort! This is virtually a pill up of stones, which can be imagined as ruin of a boundary wall.

Amodagarh is in middle of Reserved Forest. I think, ‘there must be some mention about the place in the history of the region in the Working Plan of the Forest Division’. We check the Plan later but find nothing about Amodagarh. Few internet pages mention, Amodagarh has been Sona Rani’s palace, though no serious literature is available. On Google Map, I am able to locate the place –Seoni (State Highway No. 12) – Kanhiwada – Chhui – Mordungri –Amodagarh.

One thing I can certainly assume from the site is that Amodagarh must have been among the tiniest forts in the country. Second, I can assume many would not have known the existence of this fort because of the location. This looks more like a hiding place.

I notice a group of local tourists arrive in two cars. They straight away take to stairs going down to river. It is clear they know the place. Forest Beat Guard of the area tells me, “This is local picnic place. Families and friends spend time here, eat, dance, sing and have fun in the river and forest around.” In fact, Google Map too mentions Amodagarh as a picnic spot!

Madhya Pradesh Eco-Development Board seems to be promoting the place as the forest around which Mowgli stories are weaved. A statue of Mowgli-Wolf has been erected, though, not quite attractive. A watch tower and a cafeteria have also been developed here.

I vaguely remember some lines from The Jungle Book, read 40 years ago, and some scenes from the Jungle Book movie seen later. Somehow, this really does not seem like the Jungle where the Book is plotted.

I glance though some pages on internet. It excites me to know more about Mowgli stories and more about the author. First of all, Kipling is born in Bombay (1865), lived here for six years as a kid, and after 10 years returns to work as a journalist for 7 years. Clearly, he does not spend lot of time in India. But then, he has been much appreciated author in his 20s itself. In fact, The Jungle Book (1894) has proceeded by the book ‘In the Rukh’ and followed by the book ‘The Second Jungle Book (1895)’. There have been many more famous stories in between.

The truth is that The Jungle Book is a fiction and Mowgli (man-cub), Bagheera (black panther), Baloo (bear), Sherkhan (tiger), Raksha (mother wolf), Kaa (python) etc are all characters. There is mention of ‘Seonee’ in some stories but Kipling never visited the present day Seoni forest. Nevertheless, some literature mention that he used what he knew, what he read, what he heard and what he dreamt in his stories! What surprises me more is what I learn from Britannica – ‘Kipling has received Nobel Prize for Literature in 1907’!

I remember, for quite some time, Pench forest (i.e. Pench National Park/ Tiger Reserve) has been marketed as Mowgli land by the M P Forest Department, Seoni District Administration and Pench resort owners alike. Kanha Tiger Reserve in adjacent districts too has been reported to share the Mowgli glory. I tried briefly but could not find any sure proof of the forest where Mowgli stories are plotted.  I end this piece with a question, ‘Where is The Jungle Book plotted?’

Pushp

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One comment

  1. Sunayan Sharma · July 15

    Dear Pushp Bhai, undoubtedly Seoni district is full of luxuriant forests having lot of wild life. Well I have no clue as to where this Moughli was born and brought up,may be in the thoughts of the writer. you mentioned about the Sona Rani’s fort. May be it was tiniest fort or may be it is so much old that material from its ruins got removed over period of time. Infact perhaps till 5 thousand years back ,India had matriarch society where women used to rule and after them several forts got named. I remember finding ruins of an old fort in Bansi forest range of the Udaipur forest division,in 1978. It was known to few foresters only and was called as Rani Garh. The bricks used in the fort were extraordinarily huge size. It was located in the heart of a dense teak-bamboo forest. I understand 5 thousand years is a huge time. Who knows how many times the place got ruined and reloaded with new civilizations. The present forest may be just a matter of few hundred years. You must be remembering about the infamous Bhangarh fort of Sariska. As per the legend it was the fort of the then queen Bhanumati, who was also a famous magician. I understand if proper research is done we may dig out several such forts from our forests spread over entire country. May be you can work on it.

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