Amrit Dhara

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We are in Pangot. Pangot is far from the madding crowd in Uttarakhand hills in India.  We are still farther, at Pine Wood resort, surrounded by Deodar-Oak forested hills, and valley in South-West from where we have come up. Down there is the famous village, Chhoti Haldwani (Kaladhungi). Incidentally, Kaladhungi is a place on global tourist map. This has been the winter home of the legendary, Jim Corbett, hunter turned conservationist. His home has been converted into a museum. He had set up Chhoti Haldwani by buying a large chunk of land and bringing in score of families to settle and do agriculture here. Incidentally, this is Bhabhar and Tarai area falling between hills and plain.

The hills are outer Himalayas. Pangot’s altitude is around 6500 ft. Temperature dips to 12-13°C even in summer. Cool breeze has been blowing now and again. The weather is never monotonous. It drizzles once in a while. This is quite a change from 40°C of Delhi. Of course, fresh air. No pollution. Few vehicles. The road is narrow, single lane – One has to stop and adjust to allow a vehicle from opposite direction to pass!

Trekking in the hills is quite a temptation. My young colleagues go for trekking to the nearest but highest Naina Peak (around 8600 ft). The track is probably 8-10 km with altitude gain of about 2100 ft. Incidentally, Naina Peak was previously called China or Cheena Peak. The name has been discarded after 1962 Indo-China war.

I, of course, cannot think of going with osteoarthritis of knees.  Nevertheless, I pick up a field guide on birds and a binocular and decide to a take a leisurely stroll to watch the forest and birds around and take some photos. For me, climb up or down at Pine Wood itself is a tough job. But slowly I make it to the road. The gradient on the road is tolerable. There are amazing landscapes wherever I look – Hills are 100 per cent covered with trees – deodar is deep, dark and dull green conical giants in dense patches with silver-green oak contrast them in big patches. As I look down, there is narrow gorge with immense mix of broad leaf trees including Rhododendron.  Rhododendron when blooms paint the forest blood red. Presentably, the flowering is almost over – what remains is dried bunches of flowers. I see a Himalayan Birch like stem but not sure if it is one. Likewise, another interesting medium size broad leaf tree is one with maple tree like leaves. The beauty here is, the leaves dance gracefully with lightest breeze. At places, barren rocks exposed due to hill cutting when road was made are painted in different hues with natural excretion, mosses, salts etc

I have walked about half a kilometre when I reach a small bridge over a rivulet (Naina) and it is possible to walk along the left bank up. It is zigzag and little rough but not difficult. The biggest advantage of taking this diversion is that I am not skirting vehicles any more. There are no people. It is wilder, narrower and closer scenario. I can hear birds. I can hear water. I can hear wind.

OMG! I see a rainbow on the ground. I am able to capture this in a photo. (Later when I show this photo to friends, they are amazed and wonder struck.)  Actually, a very thin and fine curtain of minute water droplets has formed due to a leaking water pipe and sun rays have been falling at an appropriate angle to paint the wonder.

I sit down on a stone to capture the wilderness in heart and mind – get drenched in the music and mystery of nature.

It’s so soothing. After every few minutes, the breeze gets strong and musical. The music is punctuated with the whistle of Himalayan blue beauty, Whistling Thrush.  I can hear a dove but unable to see it. I am not very familiar with Himalayan birds but with the help of the field-guide I am able to recognise two – Grey Winged Black Bird and Spotted Fork-tail.

While lazing around here, I notice that this small rivulet is source of drinking water for many villages. There is a maze of pipes scattered around transporting water to different destinations.

Also noticeable is wonder that the forest department is. Few metres away from the perennial minor stream, there is a sign board indicating a pond developed by it. The pond is a small depression without a drop of water!

As I walk around, I notice scores of herbs, shrubs, butterflies, insects…I photograph quite a few.

And last thing. The crystal clear water is flowing slowly down from one shallow pool to other. I bend down, curl my palm and lift water and drink. I repeat this four times. It’s pure Amrit. It feels like drinking bit of Himalayas.

Pushp

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One comment

  1. amarbisht@lifeindia.net.in · May 23

    Awesome

    Like

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