Great Lake & Great Birds

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

It is close to 11 am. February weather is just pleasant. We park our car at one side of the Great Ana Sagar lake of Ajmer, in Rajasthan. This part of lake side is known at Chowpaaty. Chowpaaty is, these days, synonymous with line-up of scores of vendors of fast food. Probably the vendors come in the afternoon, when the crowd visits the lake  – I can see the road side and part of the pathway is oily, and surrounding show signs of being used to place dishes.

Access to pathway is about 50 metres from where we park, and first thing, even before the Ana Sagar, we come face to face is a massive signage ‘I❤AJMER’. Ek photo to banta hai.

Yes, Ana Sagar is huge. I have seen a similar lake in Indore few months back. In fact, many towns have such lakes. A random thought come to my mind – the Sagar may be a century old? Later I learn, this is a historical site, not 1 but almost 9 century old – It has been ‘built by Arnoraja (alias Ana), the grandfather of Prithviraj Chauhan, in 1135 -1150 AD. Baradaris (pavilions) were built by Shahjahan in 1637 and later Daulat Bagh Gardens by Jehangir.’

Our main reason of coming here has been to see some interesting bird species and large flocks. We see some coots and gulls swimming around.

Coots are common and the species is also called Common Coot (Fulica atra). I remember, for your information in case you do not know, Coots are peculiar in some ways – it does not hide away and can be seen easily; Coots attack their own hatchlings as they are too many (up to 9) and they are unable to feed all! Another thing of interest is that Coot has a white shield-like conspicuous mark on forehead, which in the specimen here, is continuation of same white colour beak. This featherless shield has given rise to the saying ‘as bald as a coot’!

Gulls too wherever found are common and easily seen. They do not mind being fed by human beings and in some areas they would even steal from man. In Mumbai, including at the Gateway of India, morning walkers and tourists feed them. An odd tourist may even dare to pick the bird and take selfie!

I find it difficult to make out the species – Black-headed Gull (Larus ridibundus) or  Brown-headed Gull  (Larus brunnicephalus)? These are the ones commonly found. These cannot be some uncommon species e.g. Common Gull (Mew) Gull, Yellow Legged Gull, Sooty Gull…

The problem is that adults of both in winter are ‘superficially similar when at rest, with pale grey upper parts, dark primaries, a red bill with a dark tip of variable size, and dusky markings on the ear coverts and to a varying extent around and over the eye.’  One may think it will be easier to identify the bird with brown or black hood but the fact is that even the black headed gull has actually dark brown hood’!

Later at home, I go through literature and my photos and zero in on Black Headed Gull – Lesser grey, darker eyes, less stout bill (in comparison to Brown Headed Gull).

I look around to find other interesting things about the place. There is haze over and around the lake – it can be pollution! There is a featureless island in the middle of the lake. There are some boats sailing. There are scattered Aravalli hills and hillocks. I can see outside the lake there are layers and layers of houses and markets even though the lake is supposed to be on the outskirts of Ajmer. There are people and people. There are vehicles and vehicles. Lake water seems dirty.

Nothing looks really beautiful, natural, attractive or extraordinary. It has been only 15-20 minutes and we decide to leave. But we cannot. Our car says, ‘Nothing doing, you have parked me at chowpaaty and I will not leave without some snacks.’ Jokes apart, it is just not starting. We arrange for a mechanic who takes the car to a service station and we spend two hours at the workshop instead of site seeing!

We start back around 2.00 in the afternoon. Our next destination is Pushkar, just 20-25 odd kilometres from here. Oh my god, we are passing by Ana Sagar,   ‘I❤AJMER’, chowpaaty and all that again. I feel like closing my eyes.

But it turns out the other way. As we take a turn around the lake on the road towards Pushkar, the area is much more peaceful, the lakeside has been beautified with rows of green belts and plants. Suitable walkway along with ample sitting arrangement can be seen.

“Hey Sunayan Bhai, stop! What a sight!” I shout. There are scores of pelicans on two artificial mounds and an immersed small building, and several birds swimming and perched here and there – pond heron, grey heron, large egret, black headed gull, white-breasted kingfisher…

Pelicans are so conspicuous that you are bound to notice – massive white birds with huge beak and very very conspicuous gular pouch fluttering in the wind.  Off hand, I get the impression, ‘this is Rosy Pelican’. I take photographs, I make some mental notes. It has pinkish face and legs, enormous pink and yellow bill, and a dull pale-yellow gular pouch. Plumage is largely white. I make sure the identification is correct. What I did not know that this species is mainly called Great White Pelican.

Though anybody can see Great Pelican is a large bird which also flies but you will be amazed to read the measurements – 1.4 m to 1.8 m (55 to 71 in) in length with a 0.29 m to 0.47 m (11.4 to 18.5 in) beak. The wingspan measures 2.26 m to 3.6 m (7.41 to 11.81 ft) and weight 10–11 kg (22–24 lb).

To add to this, the mounds are shared with contrasting black birds i.e. cormorants.

Later, consulting literature with photos and my notes, I find that this one too is great, Great Cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo). Incidentally, here there has been no problem in identifying the species. Most of the cormorants are in breeding plumage i.e. ‘black plumage with metallic blue-green sheen; white facial skin and throat; bright yellow gular pouch and white thigh patches; silky white plumes on head and neck.’ I am able to clearly identify several, one year olds – dull brown above, white below.

Oh, what’s that! There are two pelicans swimming a little further which seem larger than any bird around. I need to take head on shots. I move a little away from the pool, so that not directly visible to the birds and I run to be on their side to take a head on shot. I am partially successful. I can make out it is different. Later, I can clearly identify, it is the largest pelican on earth – Dalmatian Pelican (Pelecanus crispus). There can be confusion with Great White Pelican but a closer look tells the difference besides the size – the beak is grey-black with bright orange gular pouch and greyish legs. The feather on head and neck are curled.  What I have been watching is, in fact, ‘the largest freshwater bird in the world’, wonderful, great.

Finally, Ana Sagar cheers me. I do say, “Ana tussi great ho.”

Pushp

Where have all the females gone?

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

I am in Sawai Madhopur for a two days personal visit to meet some old friends (3-5 February 2020). Visit to Ranthambhore Tiger Reserve is not on the agenda! Strange? There is a reason. I do not want to spoil my fantastic memories of 1980s and 90s with some shoddy ride in tourists clustered vehicle with n-number of restrictions and boundations. Ranthambhore those days used to be virtually my home. I had a free and full access of the wonder land, including on foot!

I vividly remember that on our first visit to Ranthambhore, we stayed at Jhoomar Baori. Yes, the name sounds exotic, and in fact the place is exotic. Jhoomar Baori has been the hunting lodge of the erstwhile Jaipur State, strategically located atop a hill and surrounded on all sides with good forest. Rajasthan Tourism Development Corporation (RTDC), a government agency, has restored the place and developed it into a small hotel.

I tell my friend and host, Lokendra Jain, “let us visit Jhoomar Baori.” I tell him I just want to relive my old memories when I visited the place, 35 years ago in 1984. Lokendra is awe struck when I tell him “we were the first guest on the first day of the Lodge starting as a resort!” Probably, after the maharajas, we were the first to grace the place.

I remember, the manager of the place turned out to be an acquaintance from another RTDC hotel, Tiger Den, at Sariska. There were no other guests. Tables were moved and laid on terrace. Full moon, cool breeze, forest around added to the whole experience. It turned into a grand party. It was wining and dining whole night; singing and dancing; ramp walk by friends on massive thick walls of the hunting lodge! I can say one of those memorable evenings, rather nights, when you let your spirits take wings and you soar and soar…

And today, Lokendra is driving me to the same Jhoomar Baori. As we drive from Sawai Madhopur on the Ranthambhore Road, there is a rather awkward right turn at a point where road is taking a left turn! This is entry point of the area of the lodge.

To my surprise, the area is better forested, undisturbed, and teaming with wildlife, in comparison to what it was 35 years ago. There are spotted deer, spotted deer and more spotted deer. May be 100 plus. There are some nilgais as well, may be score of them. To add to the list, there are few sambars also. Lokendra tells me that leopard is occasionally sighted here in night. Quite natural, in view of the fact that the area is teaming with wild animals. I am sure, once in a while, tiger must also be exploring the area, as we all know, wildlife doesn’t know of any boundary. This is all wonderful. To add to this, the animals are not scarred of our presence. They go about their business of eating, playing, fighting in normal course. I ask Lokendra to drive slow and stop at several places. It’s a grand photo opportunity. We see many spotted deer stags with wonderful antlers, some of them have them in velvet (Stags annually drop antlers and grow new ones. In the growing stage, the antlers are covered with skin (called velvet) which later peels off.)

This seems like about one to one and half km drive with forest on both sides of the kuchcha road. We can see, Jhoomar Baori, painted red (gerua), nestling high up there, and contrasting with dense grey forest. It’s about 200-300 m steep road which brings us to the gate of Jhoomar Baori. Ahha!

It’s more imposing than the image in my mind. There is little action around. One family is checking-in. Another vehicle is parked. Lokendra tells me, “Jhoomar Baori is not doing well, as is the situation with all government outfits. There are issues of staff and maintenance. There is more red tape than hospitality.”

Lokendra is keen to see the record of my first visit! He requests the manager to show us the first guest resister of the lodge. It is highly disappointing to know that they keep the record of only four years here and rest goes to head office. He mercilessly adds that these days, old records are destroyed as there is space constraint! Frankly, I too have been keen to see my name as a first entry in the first resister. I have been even mentally preparing myself to take mobile shot of the register entry. We just take few shots the lodge, and leave.

While returning, I suddenly realise, a peculiarity with spotted deer here – they seem all male. Did we miss the female? I discuss this with Lokendra and he agrees. Thus, on our return we make a very conscious effort to check every spotted deer we can see. Strangely, we do not come across even a single female! Even some young ones around, have few inches of antler spikes visible. It is common, that stags separate out while in velvet, but one can see females around with off springs. We try and try but no female. This is rather peculiar. Maybe we are missing something. But I always say, nature’s ways are mysterious. We do not understand even tip of the iceberg. I sometimes wonder at all the claims our wildlife biologists and ecologists make with their limited observations or studies in neatly written papers!

 

Pushp

 

A Day Out with Baz Bhadur & Rani Rupamati

I am at Baz Bhadur’s Palace in Mandu. There are no tourists. A couple of ladies come but soon go away to the other part of the palace, which is segregated from the one I am in by a connecting door. I ask two accompanying forest guards to excuse me for a while.  I find the atmosphere tranquil. The open court has a beautiful cistern in the middle. There are rooms and halls all around. I am sitting at the steps of one of the hall with open courtyard in front of me. I can see green fields and forest and hilly landscape from the open arches. They sooth eyes as well as add diverse texture to the palace. Cool breeze is blowing. I just contemplate of those days when the palace has been brimming and buzzing with life, love and intrigue. I try to be one with the surroundings. I am entirely at peace with myself. The place has some magical charm. Soon I am pleasantly surprised. I hear the romantic song of love and romance and monsoon and….

Aaoge Jab Tum Saajna
Aaoge Jab Tum Saajna
Angana Phool Khilege
Barsega Saawan, Barsega Saawan
Jhoom Jhoom Ke
Do Dil Aise Milenge
Aaoge Jab Tum Saajna
Angana Phool Khilege ….

The man is singing full blast in the other section of the palace. I do not see the singer or audience but find this real mystic. I am elated beyond words.

This experience indeed transports me 500 years back to the legendary love of Baz Bhadur and Rani Rupamati. The history is rooted at this very place. A juxtapose of images is sailing in my mind. I feel as if I am one with the scene. I imagine characters from movies, books and plays to fit in to the eternal romance and history.

The song goes on and on. Every moment is wonderful, soul filling. At the end, I clap silently – applause from the core of my heart. I feel like presenting a gift to the singer but I am in no mood to move back to present. I want to continue soaking in the spirit of the place.

A peacock makes a call to reinforce the fact that we are in the middle of natural surrounds. So do a flock of rose-ringed parakeets flying past and making shrill ‘kir, kir, kir.. .’

Slowly, I move from an opening behind me to the other section of the palace this too has halls and rooms around with a small courtyard in the centre. The only difference is that there is no outside view of the forest or hills.

We take a flight of steps to terrace. This turns out to be another interesting part of the palace. The view of the surrounding Mandu landscape with greenery is pleasing but the functional part probably must have been the clear view in the south of Rani Rupamati pavilions. These are on a slightly higher platform.  As a crow fly the distance would be around 500 m only. This palace terrace has two Baradaris (pavilion with three doors like arches on each side, all making 12 i.e. bara). I can visualise Baz Bhadur lazing around in well laid Baradari and admiring the Rani across, in one of the pavilions.

Incidentally, I have visited Rain’s pavilion last time. This is end of the road and highest point in the area. One has to walk about half a km on the inclined path way.  There are rooms and halls and arched passages. There are pavilions above. On the back, it is sheer drop of several hundred metres but provides a panorama of Nimar plains with the Narmada winding across. Guide has told me that Rani Rupamati used to visit the place daily from a palace nearby to have darshan of holy Narmada.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Yes, I do spend some time in the Baradari visualising a queen across. The song still echo in my ears and eyes look at the paradise beyond.

Pushp

 

PS: I try to dig some history. Pick up a book on Mandu by Archaeological Survey of India. It appears in mid-15th Century AD, one Malik Bayazid after the death of his father, the then Governor of Malwa region, crowned himself as an independent ruler with the title Sultan Baz Bhadur. He was not much of a king and was soon defeated by Rani Duravati. He took to music in which Rani Rupamati was his most famous associate. The devotion and love between them is reflected from the fact that they are well known part of Malwa folk songs.

It Rocks!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Green water is so still, as if it is a calm lake. But no, we are sailing in one of the most famous spot on the grand and revered Narmada River – the marble rocks. The stillness is because of the huge depth of the river. The green is the refection of the good forest on top. Massive marble rocks are rising along both edges of the river. In fact, it’s a gorge, narrow at some places and little wide at others. The guide-boatman  tells, “This used to be so narrow at one point of time that monkeys used to jump across from one side to the other.”

I am alone and relaxed in the boat. I have decided to take full boat so that it is leisurely and un-interfered sailing, viewing and photography. As we begin our journey, on the left top, I see temples, rest houses and resorts overlooking the gorge. Soon, the hangover of the Ghat and town up are past and we are sailing in the quiet part of the marble rocks. I say, it rocks!

The November weather is fine. It is slightly cloudy today. This makes the marble a little less glistening. Nevertheless, the amazing colours of marbles in different sections of the gorge fascinate. There are range of it – cream, rust, brown, grey, blue and what not. Much of the marble at places is weathered, turning almost black.

The boatman makes a good and humorous commentary on the tit-bits on the way. Atop a small marble island jutting out in the river, an oval shaped rock with garland etc has been placed, representing God Shiva (Linga). Incidentally, a red-wattled lapwing appears to be engrossed in prayer at this temple!

At places, crude shapes have been carved by nature in the rocks, adding attraction to the already great site e.g. a man like figure sitting on the chair at the edge of the hill –  give it a slight push, it can tumble down into the gorge; a playful child, a god, an elephant face with massive trunk…

In this setting, I notice an egret, perched on a rock near the water’s edge. It is not afraid of our approach. It does not fly away, when we pass by, almost at a touching distance.

Oh! A boat is parked across, appearing to be blocking the way. As we reach near, there is way to cross. I notice a young couple is being photographed by boatman in odd setting! Maybe they find it romantic.

Two hundred meters ahead, I can see and hear water gurgling. Boatman announces, “We have reached the last possible sailing point.  Ahead it is very rough.” I tell him, “No worry, turn back. I am having a wonderful time.”

I have noticed all along, there is water mark about 5-6 feet above the present water level. I have not imagined the reason. The guide tells, “Upstream, there is the Bargi dam and Hydro-Electric Project on Narmada. Every night, water is released from the project and the water level rises to the water mark.” Oh!

The guide has been explaining all that is possible in his capacity. Boatman has not been pushing for fast return. He even asks me if I want it some other way or stop anywhere. In fact, though he took me for a ride but he has not taken me for a ride! It was money and times’ worth.

Pushp

PS : The marble rocks are in Bhedaghat, a small town on the bank of Narmada, 20 km from Jabalpur a well known city in Madhya Pradesh. Bank of the river at important places have been developed as Ghats where people visit to pray and take a dip in the holy river and feel blessed. The market up the Marble Rocks is all marble – 100 per cent of the shops are dealing in marble statues and souvenirs.

 

Remember Mowgli?

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Shashi tell me, “Today we are going to one of the most important landmarks in Central India – Mowgli Land.” The very name Mowgli makes me keenly interested. Most of you would know that Mowgli is world renowned character from The Jungle Book, a fiction written by Joseph Rudyard Kipling in nineteenth century (1894). Mowgli is portrayed as man-cub reared by wolves, living among wild animals almost like a wild animal.

We start from Seoni after breakfast around 9.30. We are driving on a four lane road. As we progress, in one and an half hours, from four lane Seoni-Mandla State Highway, we are on two, and than one, and later no lane road. Finally, it’s dead end! We have arrived.

I notice from a sign board, we are in Kanhiwada Range of the South Seoni Territorial Forest Division. The place is closely surrounded by hills which are densely forested all around. Looking down a narrow gorge, I notice a rivulet flowing. Tej Bhan Pandey, Sub-Division Officer, with us informs, “This is the Hirni River, a jungle stream, originating in Rukhad Forest Range near Seoni.”

Shashi tells me, “This place is also known as Amodagarh.”  Garh is for a fort. I notice it is isolated enough today and wonder what it would have been centuries ago. There is no fort or ruin around, which I can see. I wonder if this is just an imagination. Local forest guard shows me the remains of a wall which is supposed to have surrounded the fort! This is virtually a pill up of stones, which can be imagined as ruin of a boundary wall.

Amodagarh is in middle of Reserved Forest. I think, ‘there must be some mention about the place in the history of the region in the Working Plan of the Forest Division’. We check the Plan later but find nothing about Amodagarh. Few internet pages mention, Amodagarh has been Sona Rani’s palace, though no serious literature is available. On Google Map, I am able to locate the place –Seoni (State Highway No. 12) – Kanhiwada – Chhui – Mordungri –Amodagarh.

One thing I can certainly assume from the site is that Amodagarh must have been among the tiniest forts in the country. Second, I can assume many would not have known the existence of this fort because of the location. This looks more like a hiding place.

I notice a group of local tourists arrive in two cars. They straight away take to stairs going down to river. It is clear they know the place. Forest Beat Guard of the area tells me, “This is local picnic place. Families and friends spend time here, eat, dance, sing and have fun in the river and forest around.” In fact, Google Map too mentions Amodagarh as a picnic spot!

Madhya Pradesh Eco-Development Board seems to be promoting the place as the forest around which Mowgli stories are weaved. A statue of Mowgli-Wolf has been erected, though, not quite attractive. A watch tower and a cafeteria have also been developed here.

I vaguely remember some lines from The Jungle Book, read 40 years ago, and some scenes from the Jungle Book movie seen later. Somehow, this really does not seem like the Jungle where the Book is plotted.

I glance though some pages on internet. It excites me to know more about Mowgli stories and more about the author. First of all, Kipling is born in Bombay (1865), lived here for six years as a kid, and after 10 years returns to work as a journalist for 7 years. Clearly, he does not spend lot of time in India. But then, he has been much appreciated author in his 20s itself. In fact, The Jungle Book (1894) has proceeded by the book ‘In the Rukh’ and followed by the book ‘The Second Jungle Book (1895)’. There have been many more famous stories in between.

The truth is that The Jungle Book is a fiction and Mowgli (man-cub), Bagheera (black panther), Baloo (bear), Sherkhan (tiger), Raksha (mother wolf), Kaa (python) etc are all characters. There is mention of ‘Seonee’ in some stories but Kipling never visited the present day Seoni forest. Nevertheless, some literature mention that he used what he knew, what he read, what he heard and what he dreamt in his stories! What surprises me more is what I learn from Britannica – ‘Kipling has received Nobel Prize for Literature in 1907’!

I remember, for quite some time, Pench forest (i.e. Pench National Park/ Tiger Reserve) has been marketed as Mowgli land by the M P Forest Department, Seoni District Administration and Pench resort owners alike. Kanha Tiger Reserve in adjacent districts too has been reported to share the Mowgli glory. I tried briefly but could not find any sure proof of the forest where Mowgli stories are plotted.  I end this piece with a question, ‘Where is The Jungle Book plotted?’

Pushp

Payli – Hidden in the backyard of Seoni

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

We start from Seoni around 4.00 in the afternoon. It’s still quite bright and hot being mid-June. Monsoon, I am told has got delayed. I am not aware where exactly we are going. I am only aware that we are going into some forest area and we are staying overnight. Shashi Malik, my forester friend, tells me, “just enjoy”, meaning ‘just chill’.

Our first halt is Dhuma, a small town on Seoni- Jabalpur highway (Madhya Pradesh). It’s at a locally famous sweet shop for Gulaab Jamun with Rabadi. This is real delicacy but GJ, almost the size of a grenade, is loaded with sugary syrup, and pure thickened milk Rabadi. The dish is as good as a bomb of a ton of calories. Nevertheless, I enjoy as I have somewhat sweet tooth. It’s certainly quite filling. Shashi offers tea later, but I politely decline. I want the taste GJ & R to linger on for some time.

After another 30-40 minutes of driving on four-lane monotonous highway, we turn right and are now driving on a single-lane road in hinterland. There are small hamlets, few and far. There is no other vehicle to be seen. What is amazing is the forest. It must be 80 per cent dense forest, largely teak. I can see that presently this looks like 20 per cent dense forest because of leaf fall – straight teak bolls without canopy. Its monotonous creamy-greyish spread – miles and miles of it. Soon in monsoon, this will be all green and look like 100 per cent dense forest.

It’s late evening. I suggest to Shashi, “Let us switch of Air Conditioner and roll down windows. Have some fresh air.” Shashi agrees. As we roll down the windows, in comes somewhat hot air, but fresh, mixed with fragrance of the forest – unpolluted. I wonder, I may not fall sick, for these days, I breathe ‘severally’ polluted air in Delhi and my system has got acclimatised to dirty stuff.

Shashi tell me, “We are passing through Shikara Range of North Seoni Forest Division.”

While we are breezing through the forested landscape, it is almost night fall when we suddenly halt at a place where half a dozen government vehicles are lined up and the place is buzzing with people. I notice, this is a huge complex, with lot of backyard area and lawns in the front. The building is quite big, built on a six feet raised platform, with two floors comprising five big size suits and a dining hall.  It cannot be called a Forest Rest House in the traditional context. This is in fact called, Payli Jungle Camp. I can vaguely see a water body beyond but cannot make much of it.

Shashi tells me, “There is a long story behind this complex, built may be a decade ago. This is in compensation for Old Payli FRH.  To cut the long story short, the old one got into the submergence area of Bargi Dam created on the Narmada river.”

At the Camp, I get to know Gaurav Choudhary, DFO of North Seoni Forest Division, and M K Sapra, PCCF (CAMPA) who is visiting the region to inspect the works. We spend some time together and in fact later dine together.

It is in the morning, I realise how amazingly wonderful place this is. There is huge Bargi Dam back water spread in front of the Camp which is zig-zagging into undulating hills and hillocks. In the morning Sun, this is silver sheet with ripples painted. There is forest all around. An old road intrudes into the water body for long to Payli Island. There are several islands one of which houses British time Old FRH. As crow flies, the Bargi dam is about 12 km from here though by road it is more than four times i.e. about 50 km!

Around the complex, I can see some play area for kids. A nature trail (Environmental Awareness Trekking Trail) has been developed for tourists to have some walks through adjacent forest and reach the islands and water-body.  In fact, the Camp is being managed as Eco-tourism facility. Later, I look at the Madhya Pradesh Eco-Development Board’s web page and this describes the Payli Eco Complex as

Backwater of Bargi dam forms a huge lake having enormous potential for tourism development. Realizing this fact, Madhya Pradesh Ecotourism Department Board is introducing “PAYLI” a small village sharing the backwater on its edges, just a 50 km drive from Bargi dam one can enjoy the true beauty of nature and many nature based activities such as:- Trekking, Bird Watching, Waterfall, Boating & Adventure based activities It offers accommodation in Camping Tents & Rest house, Canteen facility. Surrounding area of Payli is also good for nature tourism which includes bird watching, mammals sighting.

Franking, this facility is in making and a visitor keen to rough it out in nature, can certainly enjoy.

After breakfast we start back. On the way back, Payli is spread large on my mind. I can understand, Payli Jungle Camp has been named after the Payli village nearby, but I wonder why the Payli village has been named so. I know, Payli does not have a meaning as it is.  I feel, it can be distortion of Payali (Bowl) or Paayal (Anklet, worn by many Indian women) and to conclude, I may say, the name is closer to Payali as the landscape is bowl shaped valley with hills all around.

Pushp